Monthly Archives: May 2001

The Continental Cough and Prolonged Single Ignition Operation

There is an old adage that applies to life in general and to aviation in particular that states that if you pay attention you will always have something new to learn.  This fact of life was recently brought to my attention when I gained some new knowledge of the operation [...]

By | May 16th, 2001|Flying-Wire|Comments Off on The Continental Cough and Prolonged Single Ignition Operation

Right Hand sleeve catch

When I acquired my first Stearman, and was learning to fly it,  an old time Stearman pilot in looking it over said “ your seat belts are in backwards”. He explained that the release lever was pointed to the right instead of the left, as in the picture below. When [...]

By | May 9th, 2001|Flying-Wire|Comments Off on Right Hand sleeve catch

Concord Batteries

The Concord Battery Corporation is located in West Covina, California, with distributors for their products all over the  U.S. They sponsor an ad in the Flying Wire on page 30. Take a look at their web site. Their sealed lead/acid battery line has two sizes that are just right for [...]

By | May 9th, 2001|Flying-Wire|Comments Off on Concord Batteries

Learning to Fly in a Stearman In 1941, the British Way

Forward  When President Roosevelt sent General Arnold to Great Britain early in 1941 he empowered him to offer help in many forms to the then sorely pressed single-handed champion of democracy. One type of help offered - and eagerly accepted - was permission to set up “Contract Schools’ with civilian [...]

By | May 9th, 2001|Flying-Wire|Comments Off on Learning to Fly in a Stearman In 1941, the British Way

Finding the Cold Cylinder

Last year at the Galesburg Fly In a friend of mine came back from his pre-takeoff engine check with a frown on his face. His engine didn't sound right and it had a big drop on the mag check. As is the custom at Galesburg and with Stearman enthusiasts everywhere, [...]

By | May 9th, 2001|Flying-Wire|Comments Off on Finding the Cold Cylinder

Top 10 Resons Why FBO Courtesy Cars are Never Stolen

They have a range of about 20 miles before they overheat, break down, or drop important parts on the road, assuming they are even able to get off the airport. The last flight crew left only 1 pint of gas in it, yielding a usable range for the 2-ton, 454-powered [...]

By | May 9th, 2001|Announcements|Comments Off on Top 10 Resons Why FBO Courtesy Cars are Never Stolen